A Good Lie: How History Repeats Itself, Sometimes With Better Outcomes! Welcome “Lost Hoosiers of Syria…”


We watched a movie from 2014 last night that seemed so timely it was unreal. Here is the movie synopsis for “The Good Lie” from IMDB:

“A group of Sudanese refugees given the chance to resettle in America arrive in Kansas City, Missouri, where their encounter with an employment agency counselor forever changes all of their lives.”

The movie takes place in the Fall of 2001, just months after 9/11. The group of “lost boys” who settle in Kansas City were on the last plane out of Sudan before the US closed its Sudanese resettlement program because of fears that terrorists would find gaps in the program’s security and use it as a way to cross the US’ borders and unleash terrorism on our citizens.

Despite the political rhetoric and racist fearmongering, the movie tells the story of four orphaned children, who watched their entire family being massacred during their country’s bitter civil war.

“Consequently, they make an arduous and dangerous trek through the plains, enduring hardship, death and sacrifice all the way until they reach safety in a refugee camp in Ethiopia. Years later, these youths are among 3600 selected for resettlement in America… [They] must adjust to an alien culture even as the emotional baggage of their past haunts them. However, these newcomers, and their new friends . . . strive to understand each other in this new home, as they make peace with their histories in a challenge that will change all their lives.

 

This movie “unfolded” about events over a decade ago that I probably didn’t fully understand or appreciate at the time in the backdrop of 9/11. But, as if the universe wanted to flaunt the timely irony, these are the news stories from yesterday about events in the world, the US and nay, even our [great] State of Indiana:

“Gov. Pence suspends resettlement of Syrian refugees to Indiana following Paris terror attacks…”  [read more]

Unlike the suspension in 2001, it seems like some of us have learned our lesson, and are willing to challenge the government’s authority (or lack of authority) to act irrationally “in the name of public safety” (read: institutionalized racism and bigotry):

“Defying the governor, Indianapolis archbishop takes in Syrian refugees…” [read more]

I won’t even acknowledge the crap that ex-President-hopeful Donald Trump spewed…  Instead, I look forward to the following IMDB movie synopsis:

“A group of Syrian refugees given the chance to resettle in America arrive in Indianapolis, IN where their encounter with Hoosier Hospitality forever changes all of their lives. They must adjust to an alien culture and a racist Governor even as the emotional baggage of their past haunts them. However, these newcomers, and their new friends . . . strive to understand each other in this new home, as they make peace with their histories in a challenge that will change all their lives.

Fortunately, for the “Lost Hoosiers of Syria,” our State’s Archbishop may have learned a lesson from “The Good Lie.”  Like my own church (Broadway United Methodist), some Hoosiers haven’t given into fear but have instead chosen hope, compassion and hospitality:

Keep telling the story…

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ctfuqua

At 42, my life is in transition. I have always been a “glass half full” sort of guy. Now more than ever I see life as full of possibilities and the world full of beautiful people possessing unique and often untapped talents. I’m a learner and connector, seeking ways to leverage the abundance in this world through strong community.

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